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The Murdoch Children's Research Institute blog Featuring stories, opinons and news from our research team, patients and staff.

Professor George Patton and Professor Susan Sawyer know adolescent health is critical to current and future generations, and work hard to keep it in the centre of policy activity locally and globally.
Children will receive faster diagnosis and life-changing treatment with the first clinical guidelines in Australia to help them recover from stroke. Doctors from MCRI and The Royal Children’s Hospital developed the childhood guidelines to improve paediatric care.
Dr Supriya Raj is a Senior Research Coordinator at Murdoch Children’s Research Institute. Tell us a little bit about your background as a researcher and what influenced you personally to become a researcher. I am a dentist by training.
In 1988, while Australia celebrated its bicentenary, Dame Elisabeth Murdoch and Professor David Danks set their sights on the emerging role of genetics in public health when they opened the doors to Victorian Clinical Genetics Services (VCGS).
Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI) works to ensure the health and wellbeing of the world’s children and the adults they will become; a mission that’s advancing with the recent creation of the Melbourne Children’s Global Health initiative.
Data collected at the checkpoint between childhood and adolescence is helping researchers understand how to set kids up for the healthiest possible life. Many of the diseases and illnesses affecting Australian adults have their roots in childhood, presenting an opportunity to stamp them out before they take hold.
Vomiting uncontrollably, tiny Maelle was rushed into emergency by her parents. Tests showed that her kidneys were failing. To keep her alive doctors put her on dialysis while they planned for a transplant.
Imagine a world where cells from a sick child are used to model their disease, better understand the cause of their illness and develop customised treatments or replacement organs to aid their recovery.
Twice a week, Charlotte Matthew’s family would take her on a four-hour round trip for dialysis. The Wonthaggi girl, 4, who has congenital nephrotic syndrome, had one of her kidneys removed soon after birth and, as the other kidney failed late last year, she relied on dialysis to keep her alive.
MCRI researchers have identified a growing urgency to address child mental health and are working with our partners to establish how community-based health services can best tackle the issue in its earliest stage.