Media Centre

A resounding agreement was reached on three updates to Australian infant feeding advice by all participants, including key industry bodies at a recent Summit. The Centre for Food & Allergy Research (CFAR) Australian Infant Feeding Guidelines Summit was hosted by Murdoch Childrens Research Institute (MCRI) on Friday 13th May 2016. The Australasian Society for Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA) Guidelines provide advice and recommendations relevant to allergy prevention, on breastfeeding, the introduction of solids and supporting mothers and parents. The Centre for Food & Allergy Research (CFAR) is a national alliance of paediatric food allergy researchers and clinicians from 20 partner institutions across Australia. The Centre is coordinated from MCRI. Their collective research provides evidence to optimise food allergy management and find novel treatments. The 2016 CFAR Infant Feeding Summit is the second meeting on infant feeding. The initial roundtable was in August 2015 which summarised the research evidence on...
Heart muscle diseases are a leading cause of disability and death in children and adults but the causes remain poorly understood. The genetic changes that cause heart muscle disease are in the early stages of discovery. Identifying the genetic cause of heart disease is crucial in improving understanding of these conditions and for developing new drugs and therapies.
The Murdoch Childrens Research Institute (MCRI), in collaboration with innovation company Curve Tomorrow, is launching Bytes4Health. The program will offer digital health and medtech startups that are developing a product or interested in extending their technology into healthcare, a unique opportunity to access cutting edge medical research, clinical expertise and digital health product development experience. The Bytes4Health program will offer two companies the chance to be embedded within MCRI for four months. Companies will also receive $25,000 to go towards the development of their technology. They will work closely with research and clinical teams, including the Melbourne Childrens Trials Centre, a centre specialised in the evaluation and development of new healthcare products. They will also learn from the Curve Tomorrow team’s vast experience in developing products for healthcare professionals and patient communities. Dr James Dromey General Manager Business Development and Strategy at Murdoch Childrens Research Institute said, “Despite the growing...
Researchers from the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute (MCRI) have found that genetic techniques could be used to ‘switch on’ proteins that may protect against stomach cancer. The research, published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation investigated Helicobacter (H.) pylori, a bacteria that can cause chronic inflammation, potentially leading to stomach cancer. H. pylori infects the stomach of roughly half the world’s population. Acquired during early childhood, it triggers inflammation of the stomach lining which, according to the researchers, is harmless in around 85 per cent of infected individuals. However, in the remaining 15 per cent of people, chronic inflammation caused by H. pylori infection has more serious consequences, causing peptic ulcers and stomach cancer. Current preventative therapy for stomach cancer is based on antibiotic eradication of H. pylori. However, an increased global prevalence of antibiotic resistant H. pylori strains has resulted in current treatment strategies becoming less effective, leading to...
Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, publishing house Pinter & Martin and international health charity Teaching-aids at Low Cost (TALC) are pleased to announce the launch of Pneumonia in Children: Epidemiology, Prevention and Treatment, the first book addressing pneumonia in children, its prevention, treatment and public health control.