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Scientists from the Murdoch Children's Research Institute (MCRI) have discovered that a gene linked to performance in elite athletes also influences disease severity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common inherited muscle disease that affects around one in 3,500 boys. MCRI’s Director, Professor Kathryn North, and researchers Dr Marshall Hogarth and Dr Peter Houweling have successfully shown a link between a common variant in the gene, alpha-actinin-3 (ACTN3), and the degree of muscle weakness and rate of disease progression of DMD. Prof North and her research team are renowned internationally for their previous discovery that ACTN3 variants have a major influence on muscle performance in elite athletes and on muscle mass and strength in the general population. ACTN3 has been dubbed the ‘gene for speed’ due to its link with sprint performance ability. As a result of these findings, testing for the ACTN3 gene will likely become a part ...
Scientists from the Murdoch Children's Research Institute (MCRI) have discovered that a gene linked to performance in elite athletes also influences disease severity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common inherited muscle disease that affects around one in 3,500 boys. MCRI’s Director, Professor Kathryn North, and researchers Dr Marshall Hogarth and Dr Peter Houweling have successfully shown a link between a common variant in the gene, alpha-actinin-3 (ACTN3), and the degree of muscle weakness and rate of disease progression of DMD. Prof North and her research team are renowned internationally for their previous discovery that ACTN3 variants have a major influence on muscle performance in elite athletes and on muscle mass and strength in the general population. ACTN3 has been dubbed the ‘gene for speed’ due to its link with sprint performance ability. As a result of these findings, testing for the ACTN3 gene will likely become a part ...
New research from the Murdoch Children's Research Institute has found a link between different types of electronic media and mental health among young children. Led by Dr Lisa Mundy, the research is the first large population-based study to show clear links between the amount of time spent using TV and video games, and emotional and behavioural problems in late childhood (8-9 years). It was published today in Academic Pediatrics . “This is an important age group to study, because it’s the age at which children’s use of media begins to escalate,” Dr Mundy explains. “It’s also an age at which children are highly sensitive, due to the huge biological, psychological and emotional development, which occurs during this phase of life,” she adds. Researchers found that there were specific types of electronic media associated with these problems among 8-9 year-olds. Findings include: The use of video games among boys was associated ...