News & Events

Institute News
A/Prof Jeff Craig is a Senior Research Fellow in Environmental & Genetic Epidemiology Research Tell us about your research I study the role of epigenetics in the early life origins of chronic disease. Epigenetics refer to the molecular switches that control the activity of our genes without changing our DNA sequence. We know that the environments we encounter in the first 1000 days of life can change gene activity through changes to epigenetic switches and that these changes can last a lifetime. They can also predispose us to chronic diseases, from heart disease to autism. Through my research, I have shown that exposures such as alcohol or folate consumption in pregnancy can alter epigenetic switches. I have also found genes with epigenetic switches which are reset in people with disorders such as cerebral palsy and epilepsy. If I can replicate this finding in more samples, this could lead to earlier...
Institute News
The illustrious Peter Wills Medal was last night awarded to Professor Kim Mulholland at a gala event in Melbourne, for his lifetime of research to improve the health of children in developing countries. His work has focused on childhood pneumonia, with much involving the evaluation and introduction of new vaccines for the prevention of pneumonia in the developing world. In a research career spanning more than 30 years, Professor Mulholland has dedicated himself to leading transformative child health research projects across Africa, Asia and the Pacific with incredible outcomes. His work on childhood pneumonia, malnutrition and the links between the two with the World Health Organisation and others has contributed to new approaches that save the lives of children every day in developing countries. Research Australia CEO, Nadia Levin says the Peter Wills Medal recognises an Australian who has made an outstanding contribution to building Australia’s international reputation in health...
Student News
"I have always wanted to pursue a career in medicine as a means of learning about people. I love the concept of coming across people from all walks of life and being able to help them achieve their greatest levels of wellbeing and potential. I think it is important to remain focused on the everyday experiences in life that will help us to become engaging and empathetic doctors. This has really helped me to put the (sometimes overwhelming!) burden of study into perspective, and reminded me to continue throwing myself into new and challenging experiences with a variety of different people, often outside of the medical world. Between an undergraduate Bachelor of Biomedicine and post-graduate MD, I undertook an Honours research year. I was lucky to be able to work with the Pneumococcal Research Group at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute and the Centre for International Child Health , University...
Research News
A new evidence paper has highlighted the astonishing rates of child development from conception to the end of age two and the benefit of a holistic approach to children’s health.
Institute News
The Centre of Research Excellence (CRE) in Speech and Language team were delighted to host their official launch in August. The event brought together local, interstate and international guests from a range of disciplines including speech pathology, paediatric neurology, neuroscience and genetics to facilitate an afternoon of stimulating presentations and networking opportunities. Professor Angela Morgan opened the afternoon providing an overview of the team’s work and journey towards the CRE to date and highlighted future research directions of the CRE, which aims to explain the genetic and neural bases of speech and language disorders. Dr Frederique Liegeois, cognitive neuroscientist from the UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, made her first visit to Australia to deliver the keynote address on the neurobiology of inherited speech and language disorders. Dr Michael Hildebrand, molecular geneticist, then spoke on the approaches used to study the genetics of speech and language before Angela...