News & Events

Research News
Looks like Mother was right all along; a new study has revealed the condition of your teeth depends more on your diet and oral hygiene habits than on your genes.
Research News
An app developed by the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Royal Women’s Hospital , and the University of Melbourne could revolutionise the way cerebral palsy is diagnosed and the timing of treatment. The screening app has been offered, as part of a trial, to all Victorian parents who gave birth to a extremely preterm baby in the year to April 2017. Very small, preterm babies are at higher risk of developing cerebral palsy. Currently the average age for diagnosis of cerebral palsy in babies is 19 months, but that is often much later than ideal for maximising the benefit of treatment. The simple app, called Baby Moves, allows parents to record their baby’s movements at home at three months of age, upload the video to a secure server and a trained assessor watches the video to screen the baby for cerebral palsy. Physiotherapist Assoc Prof Alicia Spittle from the Women’s, Murdoch...
Research News
A large study of more than 1000 Australian grade three school children has found that one in five boys in this age group have an emotional or behavioural problem and lag academically about 12 months behind their peers.
Research News
Experts have found that some children with severe infections requiring intravenous (through the vein) (IV) antibiotics, can safely have these at home instead of in hospital. This will help children to leave hospital earlier, which will free up hospital beds and will allow kids to recover at home with their families. A world-wide systematic review into the delivery of IV antibiotics by nurses visiting the child in their own home looked at whether this approach to treatment was as good as in hospital in terms of safety, cost and patient satisfaction. The study published in the Lancet Infectious Diseases looked at studies across Australia and the globe where children were given IV antibiotics at home and compared them to those given in hospital. The results showed that patients and families preferred to be at home and that it was cost effective for the healthcare system, freeing up beds for other...
Institute News
Commitment to equity and fairness, as well as years of hard work has seen Louisa Di Pietro from the Genetic Support Network Victoria (GSNV) inducted in the Lifetime achievement honour roll at the 2017 Victorian Disability Awards! Former Group Leader of the GSNV (2009 – 2016) and current team member, Louisa has worked as an active peer support worker, advocate and researcher to support individuals made less able by their genetics. This includes her involvement in the establishment and facilitation of over 20 support groups in Victoria for people living with disabilities. The GSNV is co-located at MCRI and works in cooperation with MCRI and Victorian Clinical Genetics Services to better support Victorians impacted by a genetic condition and their experience with genetic health. The GSNV acts a conduit between the community and genetic health services and provides education, support and advocacy in order that a continuum of care is...