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Projects

Research project
Childhood outcomes of genomic copy number variants: The PrenatAL Microarray (PALM) study Why do we need the PALM study? The PALM study will follow up the health outcomes of children whose mothers had a particular genetic test during their pregnancy. This test, known as a microarray, looks at baby’s chromosomes, which are the packages of DNA contained in each cell. To be able to do this test the mother would have undergone a needle procedure (amniocentesis or CVS) during her pregnancy to collect a sample of the baby’s DNA. Some pregnant women who have a microarray will be told that their unborn baby has a known chromosome condition. Others will be told that there were no changes detected by the microarray. About 1 in 20 women will be told that their baby has a chromosome change that is ‘unknown’ or ‘uncertain’. This means that the health care workers do not ...
Research project
The Victorian Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Special Interest Group (VIC FASD SIG) was established in 2017 to provide an opportunity for professionals, families and researchers to connect and collaborate to build capacity to prevent, diagnose, understand and respond to FASD in Victoria. Membership is open to anyone who lives or works in Victoria with an interest in FASD. The current Chair of the SIG is Dr Kerryn Bagley from the La Trobe Rural Health School, La Trobe University in Bendigo. Coordinators are Prof Jane Halliday and Evi Muggli from the Murdoch Children's Research Institute and Prue Walker from VicFAS. Meetings are usually held every 2 months, with additional meetings called as required. We always welcome new members, please email our Chair Dr Kerryn Bagley for more information ( k.bagley@latrobe.edu.au ) Our Terms of Reference: To promote awareness and knowledge of FASD in Victoria and its service systems To share information ...
Research project
Genomic medicine is increasingly employed in clinical care of individuals with common and rare disease, although its implementation is still slow relative to the promise this technology holds. One of the major barriers to use of genomic medicine is limited provider awareness and knowledge, based on the rapid pace of development in this field but also its lack of incorporation into medical curricula and medical education training. There has been much debate as to when increased education of genetic testing and genomics should occur. The aim of this project is to assess the current understanding and knowledge of genomics in medical students across Australia and New Zealand. We have developed a short survey using REDCap to better understand the capabilities of medical students entering the healthcare workforce in Australia and New Zealand with regards to genetic testing and genomic medicine. As it is thought that genomics and personalized medicine will ...
Research project
This project aims to learn more about the health, development, wellbeing and fertility of young men conceived using ICSI whose fathers either had a problem with sperm production or a blockage preventing the passage of sperm. A number of studies have assessed the health and development of ICSI-conceived children, but only one study so far worldwide has evaluated ICSI-conceived young adults aged more than 18 years. We think it is extremely important to evaluate the health and fertility of young men conceived using ICSI because it is being used more and more frequently. More knowledge in this area will help us better inform couples who are struggling with infertility and assist fertility specialists worldwide. We conducted a similar study in 2013 in Victoria that looked at the health and development of young adults conceived with standard IVF (without ICSI) compared to young adults conceived spontaneously. The study was well received ...
Research project
Women are told not to drink during pregnancy to protect their babies. But can the occasional glass of wine hurt? And what if a woman has already had a drink before knowing she is pregnant? The Institute is seeking to answer these questions through the AQUA study.
Research project
Mi-iron is a research project which aims to measure the effect of reducing moderate iron overload back to the normal range in people with haemochromatosis. This study will compare two groups of people and measure improvement of symptoms such as fatigue, mood and general feeling of well-being.