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Projects

Research project
What is this project about? This study aims to understand the experiences of refugee background parents and the health and social care professionals caring for them in pregnancy and early parenthood during the COVID-19 pandemic in Victoria. The pandemic has presented unprecedented challenges for the entire Victorian community. Through the application of a health equity lens, it is apparent that some members of our community may experience greater challenges than others, including refugee background parents and health and social care professionals working with these families on the front-lines of the pandemic response. The knowledge generated by this phenomenological study will help to ensure our short-and-long term responses to the pandemic are informed by the needs of refuge background parents and the professionals caring for them. Listening to What Matters is a collaboration between the MCRI Refugee and Migrant Research Program and the Victorian Foundation for the Survivors of Torture (Foundation ...
Research project
What is the project about? Until now maternal suicide has remained largely unseen by society, researchers, and many health professionals. Our study, Making Sense of the Unseen, will begin to address this important gap in our knowledge. The study aims to understand women’s experiences of thoughts of suicide during pregnancy and the following year (a time known as the perinatal period). The experiences that women share with us will help us to understand and find a way to help women and families impacted by suicidality in the perinatal period. Making Sense of the Unseen is a collaboration between MCRI, James Cook University, and PANDA – Perinatal Anxiety & Depression Australia . Who can take part? We would like to hear from women who: Had thoughts of suicide during pregnancy and/or the following year within the last 5 years Lived in Australia at the time Are over 18 years of age ...
Research project
What is PrEggNut? By 1 year of age, 10% (1 in every 10) of babies will develop a food allergy. Evidence to date suggests that the ideal time to prevent food allergy may be during pregnancy and breastfeeding, but little is known about the effect of what mothers eat during pregnancy and breastfeeding on the risk of food allergies in their babies. This research is testing whether the amount of eggs and peanuts a mother eats during pregnancy and breastfeeding has an influence on her baby’s food allergy development. Study results will be used to develop national recommendations about how much egg and peanut to eat during pregnancy and breastfeeding to reduce egg and peanut allergies in babies. Who can take part? Pregnant women who: are less than 23 weeks gestation (singleton pregnancy), AND have at least two family members (themselves, partner or child/ren) with or with a history of ...
Research project
Recruitment for this study is now closed. Study Contact: 03 9936 6543 or mist@mcri.edu.au . What is MIST? We are studying a nasal spray to see if it can reduce snoring, improve sleep, and decrease the need for surgery. Snoring and difficulty breathing while asleep is very common in childhood and can cause lots of sleepless nights, as well as behaviour and concentration problems during the day. Up to now, the main treatment for snoring and difficulty breathing in sleep is surgery. We want to see if a nose spray (mometasone) can help children sleep better and avoid surgery. This medicine is already commonly used in children with hay fever and is available over the counter (without a prescription). Who can take part? Families with children: aged 3-12 years who snore most nights and have some difficulty during sleep Who can’t take part? Children who: have a serious long-term health ...
Research project
Mild Matters is a research project which aims to find out if hearing aids can help babies and young children with bilateral mild hearing loss. Babies can be born with different degrees of hearing loss. Hearing aids can help babies with moderate or greater degrees of hearing loss, but we do not know whether they help babies with mild hearing loss. This study helps us answer this important question. Throughout 2018 and 2019, we are inviting babies and children to take part in this project who: have mild permanent hearing loss in both ears are less than 2 years old are from NSW, QLD or VIC have been diagnosed within the last three months If you are interested in taking part in this study or have any questions about the research, please contact the Mild Matters research team on 03 9345-6180 or mild.matters@mcri.edu.au .
Research project
The HearS-cCMV project team is working with the Victorian Infant Hearing Screening Program (VIHSP) to provide additional services to Victorian families. This project involves an extra test for babies who do not pass their second hearing screen who are born at selected Victorian hospitals: The Royal Women’s Hospital, Parkville The Mercy Hospital for Women, Heidelberg The Monash Medical Centre, Clayton Sunshine Hospital, Western Health, Sunshine Video instructions for taking a saliva swab This extra test uses a sample of the baby’s mouth saliva (spit) to see if there was a virus (germ) called cytomegalovirus (CMV) present at the time of their birth. If the virus is present from birth it is called congenital CMV. For a very small number of babies, congenital CMV can be the cause of life-long hearing loss. For some of these babies, there may be a treatment available if the doctors know this virus is present ...
Research project
What is Vitality? There has been an increase in food allergy in recent years. The cause of this is unknown; however, the number of people experiencing allergic reactions has significantly increased. The aims of this study are to see the relationship between food allergy, vitamin D and immune function in infants. Who can take part? Mothers with infants: Age 6-12 weeks Planning to be primarily breastfed until 6 months of age (not exclusively bottle-fed) Living in Greater Melbourne, Victoria Who cannot take part? Infants already receiving vitamin D supplementation Infants born under 37 weeks gestation, under 2.5kg or with a significant medical problem What will I be asked to do? Participate in one initial home visit where we will collect samples. Complete 4 online surveys in your child’s first year of life. Attend a free allergy test appointment when your child turns one year old at the Royal Children’s Hospital. ...
Research project
Unlocking the secrets of hearing loss VicCHILD is the Victorian Childhood Hearing Impairment Longitudinal Databank. It's a Victorian register and research databank of children born with a permanent hearing loss. VicCHILD ultimately aims to help children with permanent hearing loss reach their full potentials. VicCHILD is based at the Royal Children's Hospital in Melbourne. Update your contact details Register your interest in VicChild As of March 2020, over 950 Victorian families have already contributed data to VicCHILD. The databank holds a range of information about all Victorian children born with a permanent hearing loss. The information collected and stored by VicCHILD will: help researchers and health professionals gain a better understanding of the causes and outcomes of childhood hearing loss help researchers understand why some children with a hearing loss do well, while others face greater difficulties improve intervention and treatment and ultimately the lives of children with permanent hearing ...
Research project
***The GPC STUDY is looking for students, click here for more information and to apply*** About the Study The Group Pregnancy Care study is implementing and evaluating a new approach to antenatal and postnatal care that involves inter-agency collaboration between public maternity hospitals, refugee settlement agencies, and maternal and child health (MCH) services. The aim of the program is to provide multifaceted, culturally appropriate preventive health care, information and support to refugee women during and after pregnancy in a group setting. The program is cost-free; provides care and information that is woman-directed, culturally appropriate and in women’s language; and facilitates links and referrals to services as necessary. For information about the different Group Pregnancy Care sites click on the link: Healthy Happy Beginnings, Karen families in Werribee Happy Mothers, Assyrian Chaldean Families in Craigieburn Program Principles The organisations and staff involved have agreed to apply these principles: Community consultation and ...
Research project
Commencing in 1983, the Australian Temperament Project (ATP) is an ongoing longitudinal study that has followed the development of a large group of Victorian children from infancy to adulthood, and is now following their children.