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Projects

Research project
The 2000 Stories project (Victorian Adolescent Health Cohort Study) is a landmark longitudinal study spanning more than 20 years. The project began in 1992, when a group of around 2000 Year 9 students aged 14 to 15 were selected to participate. In 2006, additional funding was received to extend the 2000 Stories study to examine health and well-being across generations in the Victorian Intergenerational Health Cohort Study.
Research project
The Aboriginal Families Study is a cross sectional population-based study investigating the views and experiences of mothers having an Aboriginal baby in South Australia between July 2011 and June 2013. The study aims to compare experiences and views of women attending standard models of antenatal care with those accessing care via Aboriginal Family Birthing Program services.
Research project
Food allergies are becoming more and more common in children and babies. This means that a lot of children end up on hospital outpatient waiting lists for specialist allergy advice. As hospital waiting list times are around 18 months, we want to try a new approach to caring for babies and children with possible food allergies. Funding This research is funded by The Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH) Foundation. Aims This research project aims to improve the management of food allergies in babies and children and is designed to see if community paediatricians (children’s doctors) can look after children with possible food allergies in a similar way to The Royal Children’s Hospital allergy specialists. In this study, we will compare two groups of children with possible food allergy: Group 1 “RCH Allergy Clinic Group” - children currently on RCH Hospital Allergy Clinic wait list, who will stay on the wait list...
Research project
Women are told not to drink during pregnancy to protect their babies. But can the occasional glass of wine hurt? And what if a woman has already had a drink before knowing she is pregnant? The Institute is seeking to answer these questions through the AQUA study.
Research project
About the Australian and New Zealand Childhood Arthritis Risk factor Identification STudY (ANZ-CLARITY) In this research project, we are establishing a national juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) biobank, called ANZ-CLARITY (Australian and New Zealand ChiLdhood Arthritis Risk factor Identification sTudY). The ANZCLARITY study working to better understand the form of childhood arthritis called JIA in hopes of improving care, identifying cause, and eventually, finding a cure. JIA belongs to a group of illnesses called autoimmune diseases. Your body has an immune system, which fights germs and keeps you healthy. In autoimmune diseases the body’s immune system mistakes a normal part of the body for something foreign (like a germ), and starts attacking the body itself. In JIA the immune system attacks the joints and sometimes other body tissues. This is called an autoimmune process and we do not understand exactly how and why this happens. The symptoms of JIA are joint...
Research project
The newly established Australian Hand Difference Register (AHDR) is a database of children born with a hand difference and/or arm difference. The AHDR is managed by researchers at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, which is located at The Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne. To begin with, the AHDR will focus on children attending The Royal Children’s Hospital, before being extended within Victoria, and then Australia-wide. The AHDR aims to: find out how many children are born with a hand/arm difference in Australia learn more about possible causes and risk factors gain information to help plan services identify possible participants for future research The AHDR is currently funded by Aussie Hands ( The Aussie Hands Foundation Inc. ), a support group for people who have a hand difference and their families, and additional funding has been obtained from the Australasian Foundation for Plastic Surgery . Funding organisations do not have access...
Research project
Bridging the Gap is a partnership program that brings together health service clinicians and managers, policy makers and researchers to bring about sustainable improvements in the quality of maternity and early childhood health care to improve health and health care outcomes for families of refugee background. The Bridging the Gap partnership aims to work towards earlier and better identification of families of refugee background, and increasing understanding of the refugee experience.
Research project
CardioRegen The Melbourne Children’s Centre for Cardiovascular Genomics and Regenerative Medicine (CardioRegen) is an integrated clinical and research program across the Melbourne Children’s Campus and Parkville Precinct. Our vision is to transform the clinical care of patients with childhood heart disease by bringing together researchers across the translational continuum from discovery science to the clinic. CardioRegen encompasses three major research programs in Diagnostics, Discovery and Translation, which are broadly focused on understanding the genetic causes of childhood heart disease and developing novel regenerative therapies for children with heart failure. Childhood Heart Disease and Heart Failure Heart disease is the leading cause of death and disability in children, affecting up to 1 in 100 live births. Complex forms of childhood heart disease (CHD) often require multiple surgical interventions during early childhood and adolescence. Surgical advances over the past 20 years have dramatically increased survival rates, with more than 85% of children...
Research project
The Childhood to Adolescence Transition Study (CATS) is a unique longitudinal study of children in metropolitan Melbourne as they approach adolescence. The study began in 2012 and is following over 1200 children from Grade 3 (8-9 years of age). The study aims to improve understanding of the many influences on the health and emotional adjustment of children as they approach their teens.
Research project
The Children's Attention Project (CAP) is about the long-term effects that ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) have on children's behaviour, learning and day-to-day living, and also on their parents' well-being. We ask families with and without these difficulties to take part in the research, to compare. CAP is the only long-term follow up study of ADHD in Australia and one of the first studies of its kind worldwide.