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Projects

Research project
The Children's Attention Project (CAP) is about the long-term effects that ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) have on children's behaviour, learning and day-to-day living, and also on their parents' well-being. We ask families with and without these difficulties to take part in the research, to compare. CAP is the only long-term follow up study of ADHD in Australia and one of the first studies of its kind worldwide.
Research project
Genomic medicine is increasingly employed in clinical care of individuals with common and rare disease, although its implementation is still slow relative to the promise this technology holds. One of the major barriers to use of genomic medicine is limited provider awareness and knowledge, based on the rapid pace of development in this field but also its lack of incorporation into medical curricula and medical education training. There has been much debate as to when increased education of genetic testing and genomics should occur. The aim of this project is to assess the current understanding and knowledge of genomics in medical students across Australia and New Zealand. We have developed a short survey using REDCap to better understand the capabilities of medical students entering the healthcare workforce in Australia and New Zealand with regards to genetic testing and genomic medicine. As it is thought that genomics and personalized medicine will ...
Research project
What is the project about? Until now maternal suicide has remained largely unseen by society, researchers, and many health professionals. Our study, Making Sense of the Unseen, will begin to address this important gap in our knowledge. The study aims to understand women’s experiences of thoughts of suicide during pregnancy and the following year (a time known as the perinatal period). The experiences that women share with us will help us to understand and find a way to help women and families impacted by suicidality in the perinatal period. Making Sense of the Unseen is a collaboration between MCRI, James Cook University, and PANDA – Perinatal Anxiety & Depression Australia . Who can take part? We would like to hear from women who: Had thoughts of suicide during pregnancy and/or the following year within the last 5 years Lived in Australia at the time Are over 18 years of age ...
Research project
The Childhood Resilience Study is a four year study aiming to develop a better understanding of how this happens, and in particular, how children grow up to be strong and resilient.
Research project
The Early Language in Victoria Study (ELVS) aims to learn more about how language develops from infancy (eight months) to adolescence and in particular, why language development is more difficult for some children. This information will be helpful in developing early intervention and prevention programs for children.
Research project
Why is this study being run? Fewer than ten percent of Australians eat according the dietary guidelines. This study is study focused on the health effects of women’s diets during pregnancy. We believe that helping pregnant women to eat better may be relevant for improving the health of mothers and their babies. Because of this, we are conducting a study to test an educational dietary program delivered in the third trimester (from week 26) of pregnancy. We would like to see if the program is helpful to mothers, and also assess any benefits it might have on aspects of mothers’ health (both physical and mental), and aspects of their baby’s health after birth, including gut bacteria.
Research project
PETS is a research project being conducted by the Murdoch Children's Research Institute at The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne. PETS is a study of twins, from when they were in the womb through to childhood and beyond. We aim to work out what makes us all who we are; our health, development and wellbeing. We have chosen to start our research with twins, who share the same mother, but are usually in their own 'sac' during pregnancy, then share the same home environment as children. Despite this, even 'identical' twins can have different personalities, physical characteristics and illnesses. We want to know why these differences exist and what they can tell us about the first years of life. It would be of great value to us if you have any suggestions or comments you would like to make about our research and what research questions interests you. Your comments could ...
Research project
Chief investigators: A/Prof Sharon Goldfeld (Lead Chief Investigator), University of Melbourne Department of Paediatrics, Royal Children’s Hospital, Murdoch Children's Research Institute Prof Billie Giles-Corti, McCaughey VicHealth Centre, The University of Melbourne A/Prof Robert Tanton, NATSEM, University of Canberra A/Prof Sally Brinkman, University of Western Australia Centre for Child Health Research Prof Ilan Katz, Social Policy Research Centre, University of New South Wales A/Prof Geoff Woolcock, Wesley Mission Brisbane, Griffith University Federal and state government partner organisations: Australian Government Department of Education and Training Australian Bureau of Statistics Victorian Department of Education and Training Australian Capital Territory Community Services Directorate Children’s Health Queensland Hospital and Health Service South Australia Department for Education and Child Development New South Wales Department of Education and Communities Queensland Department of Education, Training and Employment New South Wales Department of Families and Community Services Non-government partner organisations: The Smith Family Murdoch Children's Research Institute Wesley Mission ...
Research project
The Kids in Communities Study (KiCS) is working to understand how different factors in our communities—physical environment, social environment, socio-economic factors, access to services, and governance—influence the way that children develop. We know that the early childhood years have a profound and lasting impact on children’s health and developmental outcomes. We also know that there are different factors in our communities that play a major role in the healthy development of children, particularly the resources that families can access. We don’t know exactly which community factors impact child development, and how we can modify those factors to help all children to have the best start in life. The what and the how is what KiCS wants to answer. The origins of KiCS KiCS was developed from the Australian Early Development Census (AEDC) findings. Formerly known as the Australian Early Development Index (AEDI), the AEDC is a population level measure of ...