photo of Prof Jane Halliday

Prof Jane Halliday

Prof Jane Halliday

Details

Role Group Leader / Principal Research Fellow
Research area Genetics
Professor Jane Halliday: BSc (Hons), PhD; FPHAA (Fellow of the Public Health Association of Australasia); AM (Member of the Order of Australia, for significant services to medicine and reproductive epidemiology). Principal Fellow, Genetics Theme, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI) and Honorary Professor, University of Melbourne, Department of Paediatrics.
Jane began at the at the MCRI as a part-time clinical research assistant in the early 1980s, in the Genetics Department, completing a PhD in epidemiology in 1994, focused on prenatal genetic testing. She became Manager of the Victorian Perinatal Data Collection Unit, Department of Human Services (part-time) and Epidemiologist in charge of the Victorian Birth Defects Register (part-time). During this period, she also built her MCRI research team, becoming a Group Leader, and gained 21 years of personal support funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC). Her research interests include: 1) evaluation of genetic health services related to prenatal diagnosis and screening for birth defects; 2) measuring the impact of potentially harmful prenatal exposures (e.g. alcohol, assisted reproduction technologies) on the health and wellbeing of babies, children and young adults, integrating knowledge in epigenetics, genetic, environmental and psychosocial risk factors.
Jane was elected President of the Australasian Epidemiological Association from 2004-8 and played a key role in conceptualisation and direction of the first Australasian Population Health Congress in 2008, with over 1200 participants. A great honour was the invitation to present the 2010 Human Genetics Society of Australasia Conference Oration – “in recognition of her outstanding contribution to human genetics in Australia”. She has been a key participant in research activities of the International Clearinghouse of Birth Defects Surveillance and Research and was nominated Secretary in 2009. She was appointed to the Australian Health Ethics Committee from 1998-2000, as the nominated representative of the Public Health Association of Australia and to the NHMRC Human Genetics Advisory Committee (2007-12). Since 1997, she has received grants amounting to almost $17.5million, produced 220 peer-reviewed publications, and been invited to give >150 seminars/conference presentations. Jane has supervised 77 postgraduate students in total, mentoring them along the way. Communication of research findings with consumers/stakeholders through many media events and public presentations have been prominent in her career.
Professor Jane Halliday: BSc (Hons), PhD; FPHAA (Fellow of the Public Health Association of Australasia); AM (Member of the Order of Australia, for significant services to medicine and reproductive epidemiology). Principal Fellow, Genetics Theme,...
Professor Jane Halliday: BSc (Hons), PhD; FPHAA (Fellow of the Public Health Association of Australasia); AM (Member of the Order of Australia, for significant services to medicine and reproductive epidemiology). Principal Fellow, Genetics Theme, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI) and Honorary Professor, University of Melbourne, Department of Paediatrics.
Jane began at the at the MCRI as a part-time clinical research assistant in the early 1980s, in the Genetics Department, completing a PhD in epidemiology in 1994, focused on prenatal genetic testing. She became Manager of the Victorian Perinatal Data Collection Unit, Department of Human Services (part-time) and Epidemiologist in charge of the Victorian Birth Defects Register (part-time). During this period, she also built her MCRI research team, becoming a Group Leader, and gained 21 years of personal support funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC). Her research interests include: 1) evaluation of genetic health services related to prenatal diagnosis and screening for birth defects; 2) measuring the impact of potentially harmful prenatal exposures (e.g. alcohol, assisted reproduction technologies) on the health and wellbeing of babies, children and young adults, integrating knowledge in epigenetics, genetic, environmental and psychosocial risk factors.
Jane was elected President of the Australasian Epidemiological Association from 2004-8 and played a key role in conceptualisation and direction of the first Australasian Population Health Congress in 2008, with over 1200 participants. A great honour was the invitation to present the 2010 Human Genetics Society of Australasia Conference Oration – “in recognition of her outstanding contribution to human genetics in Australia”. She has been a key participant in research activities of the International Clearinghouse of Birth Defects Surveillance and Research and was nominated Secretary in 2009. She was appointed to the Australian Health Ethics Committee from 1998-2000, as the nominated representative of the Public Health Association of Australia and to the NHMRC Human Genetics Advisory Committee (2007-12). Since 1997, she has received grants amounting to almost $17.5million, produced 220 peer-reviewed publications, and been invited to give >150 seminars/conference presentations. Jane has supervised 77 postgraduate students in total, mentoring them along the way. Communication of research findings with consumers/stakeholders through many media events and public presentations have been prominent in her career.

Top Publications

  • Elhakeem, A, Taylor, AE, Inskip, HM, Huang, J, Tafflet, M, Vinther, JL, Asta, F, Erkamp, JS, Gagliardi, L, Guerlich, K, et al. Association of Assisted Reproductive Technology With Offspring Growth and Adiposity From Infancy to Early Adulthood. JAMA Network Open 5(7) : e2222106 2022
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  • Elhakeem, A, Taylor, AE, Inskip, HM, Huang, J, Mansell, T, Rodrigues, C, Asta, F, Blaauwendraad, SM, Håberg, SE, Halliday, J, et al. Association of assisted reproductive technology with long-term offspring cardiometabolic health: a multi-cohort study. 2022
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  • Hammarberg, K, Halliday, J, Kennedy, J, Burgner, DP, Amor, DJ, Doyle, LW, Juonala, M, Ranganathan, S, Welsh, L, Cheung, M, et al. Does being conceived by assisted reproductive technology influence adult quality of life?. Human Fertility 1 -7 2022
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  • Elhakeem, A, Taylor, AE, Inskip, HM, Huang, J, Tafflet, M, Vinther, JL, Asta, F, Erkamp, JS, Gagliardi, L, Guerlich, K, et al. Association of assisted reproductive technology with offspring growth and adiposity from infancy to early adulthood. 2022
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  • Muggli, E, Hearps, S, Halliday, J, Elliott, EJ, Penington, A, Thompson, DK, Spittle, A, Forster, DA, Lewis, S, Anderson, PJ. A data driven approach to identify trajectories of prenatal alcohol consumption in an Australian population-based cohort of pregnant women. Scientific Reports 12(1) : 4353 2022
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