photo of Prof Kim Mulholland

Prof Kim Mulholland

Prof Kim Mulholland

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Role Group Leader / Snr Princ Research Fellow

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Available for student supervision
Professor Kim Mulholland is an Australian paediatrician, who trained at the University of Melbourne and The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne. He completed post-graduate training in immunology, respiratory medicine and tropical medicine.

Kim’s main research focus is vaccines, and he is considered an authority in his field. He has been a member of the WHO SAGE (Scientific Advisory Group of Experts) on immunization since 2020.

Kim has been a Senior Principal Research Fellow at MCRI since 2003 and leads the New Vaccines Research Group. He established leading pneumococcal microbiology and immunology laboratories at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute (MCRI), Melbourne, along with major field research programs in Vietnam, Fiji, Indonesia and Mongolia. He is the Co-Director of Global Health at MCRI.
A major area of work currently is 3 Covid Vaccine clinical trials being conducted in Australia, Indonesia and Mongolia.

Kim has been leading a programme of PCV clinical trials in Vietnam for the past decade. He also leads HPV research programs in Mongolia, Vietnam and Ethiopia. He has worked on RSV research projects for over 30 years and currently leads projects in Mongolia and Vietnam. He has co-led the typhoid research project in Fiji since 2012. He has been involved in the oversight of many vaccine trials, serving on steering committees or DSMBs for a range of vaccines including Pneumococcal, Dengue, RSV, malaria and Covid-19 vaccines.
Kim joined the Medical Research Council Laboratories, Gambia in 1989, where he developed a program of research covering all aspects of the problem of childhood pneumonia. This included studies of the aetiology, clinical signs, and treatment of pneumonia cases, with particular reference to very young infants and malnourished children.

These studies helped to guide WHO policy in the field and contributed to the development of the strategy of Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI), as well as guiding oxygen and antibiotic management for hospitalized children. In Gambia, he also worked on several projects relating indoor air pollution to pneumonia. His Hib vaccine trials were the first to demonstrate the capacity of conjugate vaccines to prevent bacterial pneumonia and paved the way for Hib vaccine introduction in Africa.

After six years in the Gambia, he joined WHO HQ where he oversaw the development of standardized methods for the evaluation of pneumonia vaccines in developing countries. At WHO he was also the focal point for air pollution in the Child and Adolescent Health Department and helped design the RESPIRE study.

Since leaving WHO in 2000 he has continued to work in the pneumonia field with particular emphasis on vaccines. He was one of the founders of the Global Action Plan for Pneumonia and one of the leaders of the successful Hib Initiative project that saw the introduction of Hib vaccines into the poorest countries of the world.

Feel free to mention Kim in a post or ask him about Vaccine, Pneumococcal, HPV, and Typhoid.
Professor Kim Mulholland is an Australian paediatrician, who trained at the University of Melbourne and The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne. He completed post-graduate training in immunology, respiratory medicine and tropical medicine.

Kim’s...
Professor Kim Mulholland is an Australian paediatrician, who trained at the University of Melbourne and The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne. He completed post-graduate training in immunology, respiratory medicine and tropical medicine.

Kim’s main research focus is vaccines, and he is considered an authority in his field. He has been a member of the WHO SAGE (Scientific Advisory Group of Experts) on immunization since 2020.

Kim has been a Senior Principal Research Fellow at MCRI since 2003 and leads the New Vaccines Research Group. He established leading pneumococcal microbiology and immunology laboratories at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute (MCRI), Melbourne, along with major field research programs in Vietnam, Fiji, Indonesia and Mongolia. He is the Co-Director of Global Health at MCRI.
A major area of work currently is 3 Covid Vaccine clinical trials being conducted in Australia, Indonesia and Mongolia.

Kim has been leading a programme of PCV clinical trials in Vietnam for the past decade. He also leads HPV research programs in Mongolia, Vietnam and Ethiopia. He has worked on RSV research projects for over 30 years and currently leads projects in Mongolia and Vietnam. He has co-led the typhoid research project in Fiji since 2012. He has been involved in the oversight of many vaccine trials, serving on steering committees or DSMBs for a range of vaccines including Pneumococcal, Dengue, RSV, malaria and Covid-19 vaccines.
Kim joined the Medical Research Council Laboratories, Gambia in 1989, where he developed a program of research covering all aspects of the problem of childhood pneumonia. This included studies of the aetiology, clinical signs, and treatment of pneumonia cases, with particular reference to very young infants and malnourished children.

These studies helped to guide WHO policy in the field and contributed to the development of the strategy of Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI), as well as guiding oxygen and antibiotic management for hospitalized children. In Gambia, he also worked on several projects relating indoor air pollution to pneumonia. His Hib vaccine trials were the first to demonstrate the capacity of conjugate vaccines to prevent bacterial pneumonia and paved the way for Hib vaccine introduction in Africa.

After six years in the Gambia, he joined WHO HQ where he oversaw the development of standardized methods for the evaluation of pneumonia vaccines in developing countries. At WHO he was also the focal point for air pollution in the Child and Adolescent Health Department and helped design the RESPIRE study.

Since leaving WHO in 2000 he has continued to work in the pneumonia field with particular emphasis on vaccines. He was one of the founders of the Global Action Plan for Pneumonia and one of the leaders of the successful Hib Initiative project that saw the introduction of Hib vaccines into the poorest countries of the world.

Feel free to mention Kim in a post or ask him about Vaccine, Pneumococcal, HPV, and Typhoid.

Top Publications

  • Fagerli, K, Ulziibayar, M, Suuri, B, Luvsantseren, D, Narangerel, D, Batsaikhan, P, Tsolmon, B, de Campo, J, de Campo, M, Dunne, EM, et al. Impact of childhood 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction on adult pneumonia hospitalisations in Mongolia: a time series analysis. The Lancet Regional Health - Western Pacific 44: 100983 2024
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  • Manna, S, Werren, JP, Ortika, BD, Bellich, B, Pell, CL, Nikolaou, E, Gjuroski, I, Lo, S, Hinds, J, Tundev, O, et al. Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 33G: genetic, serological, and structural analysis of a new capsule type. Microbiology Spectrum 12(1) : e03579 -e03523 2024
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  • Hoe, E, Boelsen, LK, Toh, ZQ, Sun, GW, Koo, GC, Balloch, A, Marimla, R, Dunne, EM, Tikoduadua, L, Russell, FM, et al. Reduced IL-17A Secretion Is Associated with High Levels of Pneumococcal Nasopharyngeal Carriage in Fijian Children. PLOS ONE 10(6) : e0129199 2024
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  • Hoe, E, Nathanielsz, J, Toh, ZQ, Spry, L, Marimla, R, Balloch, A, Mulholland, K, Licciardi, PV. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Vitamin D on Human Immune Cells in the Context of Bacterial Infection. Nutrients 8(12) : 806 2024
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  • Dunne, EM, Murad, C, Sudigdoadi, S, Fadlyana, E, Tarigan, R, Indriyani, SAK, Pell, CL, Watts, E, Satzke, C, Hinds, J, et al. Carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Staphylococcus aureus in Indonesian children: A cross-sectional study. PLOS ONE 13(4) : e0195098 2024
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