Sleep

Child sleeping
Sleep is important for growth, immunity, learning and memory. Sleep provides energy to work, play and function properly. 

Good sleep habits are essential to the health, wellbeing, development and learning of infants and children. Babies, children and teenagers need different amounts which change as they age.

Sleep restores children physically, is vital for thinking, learning and concentration and boosts immunity, protecting from sickness. Sleep helps children grow as their bodies produce growth hormone while asleep.

Lack of adequate sleep impacts coping skills, behaviour and co-ordination, and is linked to inattention, unhappiness and poorer social and emotional skills, learning and memory formation.

Most adolescents don’t receive the recommended amount of sleep on school nights which is linked to depression and anxiety.

Children with autism, ADHD, and certain respiratory or developmental conditions are more prone to sleep problems.

Infant sleep problems are related to increased risks of postnatal depression.
Child sleeping

Who does it affect?

Who does it affect?

Our sleep research

Our sleep research

We found two sessions advising parents on healthy sleep habits and behavioural strategies improved the sleep of children with ADHD and are trialling an adapted version for children with autism and behavioural sleep problems.

Most children with epilepsy have sleep problems which reduce learning ability and can trigger seizures. We’re collaborating with UK researchers to evaluate an online sleep intervention in children with epilepsy.

Chronic fatigue syndrome affects one in 1,000 Australian children and adolescents. We’re researching CFS (or Myalgic Encephalomyelitis) to better understand the condition and its progression, evaluate interventions and embed evidence-based practice into care.

About 10 per cent of children worldwide snore or have difficulty breathing while asleep. This can cause sleepless nights and behaviour and concentration problems during the day. The main treatment is surgery but we’re investigating if an anti-inflammatory nasal spray (mometasone) for treating hay fever can reduce snoring, improve sleep and avoid tonsillectomy.

With the Royal Children’s Hospital Respiratory Department, we’re assessing the usefulness and acceptability of sleep studies via telemedicine for patients at home.

We’re investigating a school nurse intervention for prep students with sleep problems stemming from .

We’d like to investigate the impact that lack of sleep has on parents as this can affect their relationship with their child and partner, cause tension and be a health issue for parents because everyone’s exhausted and cranky.

Our vision

Our vision

Our goal is to promote and enable good sleeping habits in babies, children and adolescents. This will help them live their best life and transform the lives of their parents and families.