MIST+ Trial

Research area: Population Health > Population Allergy  | Status: Active

child using nasal spray

Efficacy of intranasal steroid for children with Sleep-Disordered Breathing non-responsive to initial treatment with intranasal saline: A Randomized Trial (MIST+)

Snoring affects up to 10% of children and can cause sleeping problems and concentration or behavioural issues in the daytime.

MIST+ is trialling a nasal spray to see if it will reduce the need for surgery for snoring in children aged 3-12.

 

Snoring affects up to 10% of children and can cause sleeping problems and concentration or behavioural issues in the daytime.

MIST+ is trialling a nasal spray to see if it will reduce the need for surgery for snoring in children aged 3-12.

 

Snoring affects up to 10% of children and can cause sleeping problems and concentration or behavioural issues in the daytime.

MIST+ is trialling a nasal spray to see if it will reduce the need for surgery for snoring in children aged 3-12.

 

Overview

Currently, the most common treatment for snoring is surgery to remove the tonsils and/or adenoids, however many children wait a long time to see a specialist. We are trying to find out if saline, a salty water nasal spray, or a steroid nasal spray called mometasone furoate are effective at treating symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing.

Why are we doing this?

Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) can affect your child’s ability to sleep through the night, their emotions and behaviour in the daytime, and the whole family’s quality of life. SDB is often caused by enlarged tonsils or adenoids – the soft tissue at the back of the throat and nose and is often treated by removing the tonsils and/or adenoids with surgery (tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy). This operation is now the most common elective surgery for children in Australia, and SDB is the most common reason for this surgery.

Currently, in many hospitals, there are long waiting lists for this surgery, which leads to delays in treatment. Surgery also has significant potential risks from both the operation and the anesthetic, such as pain, bleeding, and sometimes difficulty breathing. Surgery can also be expensive.

Steroids are a type of anti-inflammatory medication that is used for many conditions in children and adults. Steroid nasal sprays are used for children with hay fever. Saline is a saltwater nasal spray that is used to relieve nasal congestion and clean the nasal passages.

We are testing to see if these treatments can reduce the size of the adenoids and tonsils to allow easier breathing, reduce the symptoms of SDB and reduce the need for surgery.

girl snoringInformation for participants

What will I need to do?

Participation in MIST+ involves:

  • Your child using a nasal spray each day at home for 6 or 12 weeks,
  • Attending 2 virtual telehealth appointments
  • Attending one face-to-face appointment at either the Royal Children’s Hospital or Monash Children’s Hospital
  • Completing regular online questionnaires over a two-year period.

Who can take part?

  • Children 3-12 years old
  • Children currently on the waitlist to see a specialist for symptoms of sleep disordered breathing (including snoring, possible obstructive sleep apnoea or with a request for a sleep study) at the Royal Children’s Hospital or Monash Children’s Hospital

Who can’t take part?

  • Children who have already had their tonsils and/or adenoids removed
  • Children with a significant medical condition
  • Children who use antihistamine or decongestant nasal sprays daily

Please note: Your child will remain on the waiting list for their hospital clinical appointment with the specialist and their participation in the study should not interfere with this. 

Get involved

Register your interest in the MIST+ trial below.

Register your interest

Contact us

MIST+ Project
Murdoch Children's Research Institute
The Royal Children's Hospital
50 Flemington Road
Parkville VIC 3052
Australia

Study Coordinator: Deborah Anderson
Email:

 
child in hospital

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