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Victorian Government commits $14 million to improve health and wellbeing of future generations

Institute News
Published: 
Monday, May 27, 2019 - 3:28pm

The Victorian Government today committed $14 million over the next two years to reduce the burden of complex health issues facing children across the state. The funding will support the Generation Victoria (GenV) program led by the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute.

GenV is one of the largest community partnerships for data collection ever proposed, aiming to collect an array of life-time health and development statistics for every Victorian newborn to enable better prediction, prevention and treatment of problems in child health, development and wellbeing..

Today’s investment builds on the initial $2 million funding from the Andrews Government in 2017, and leverages $24.5 million contributed by the Paul Ramsay Foundation.

The Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI) welcomes the Victorian Government’s commitment to improving the health, development and wellbeing of Victorian children.

MCRI Professor and GenV Director, Melissa Wake, said that parents of all babies born in Victoria over a two-year period would be invited to take part in GenV, – representing around 160,000 babies.

“Our children face an epidemic of complex health and development problems,” Prof Wake said.

“By involving children and families from right across Victoria in this once-in-a-generation initiative, GenV will address the pressing needs facing children, including in our regional and rural communities. Solving these complex problems requires a statewide approach with all Victorian families participating and benefiting.”

MRCI Director, Prof Kathryn North, said that GenV was a game-changer for the way that children’s health is conducted locally and internationally.

“GenV’s vision is to work with researchers, practitioners and policy-makers to solve the complex issues facing our children,” Prof North said. “We aim to improve prevention, prediction, treatments and interventions for ailments like asthma, autism, allergies and mental illness in children and the adults they will become.”

GenV will be led from the Melbourne Children’s Campus (Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Royal Children’s Hospital and The University of Melbourne Department of Paediatrics) with local, national and international partners across health, education, philanthropy, government and community.

Available for interview:

  • Prof Melissa Wake, GenV Director
  • Prof Kathryn North, MCRI Director

Media Contact

Christine Tondorf, MCRI Media Advisor
Christine.tondorf@mcri.edu.au
03 9936 6197 or 0413 307 092