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Ben Lyneham

Ben Lyneham

Details

Role PhD Student
Research area Stem Cell Medicine
Benjamin Lyneham is a PhD candidate at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute.

Benjamin completed his Bachelor of Science at La Trobe University, followed by undertaking an Honours year at Deakin University under the supervision of Dr Timothy Ellis and Dr Bernhard Dichtl. During this time, Benjamin targeted a recombinant protein, called brazzein, to the secretory pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

In 2023, Benjamin began his PhD under the supervisor of Associate Professor Shireen Lamande, Dr Elizabeth Ng and Professor John Bateman. His research project involves using cartilage and bone organoids to model Schmid-type metaphyseal chondrodysplasia (MCDS), a rare genetic skeletal disorder which arises from defective type X collagen. He is also studying the transition of cartilage to bone, with a particular focus on understanding the role of RUNX2 and rare cell populations.
Benjamin Lyneham is a PhD candidate at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute.

Benjamin completed his Bachelor of Science at La Trobe University, followed by undertaking an Honours year at Deakin University under the supervision of Dr Timothy...
Benjamin Lyneham is a PhD candidate at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute.

Benjamin completed his Bachelor of Science at La Trobe University, followed by undertaking an Honours year at Deakin University under the supervision of Dr Timothy Ellis and Dr Bernhard Dichtl. During this time, Benjamin targeted a recombinant protein, called brazzein, to the secretory pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

In 2023, Benjamin began his PhD under the supervisor of Associate Professor Shireen Lamande, Dr Elizabeth Ng and Professor John Bateman. His research project involves using cartilage and bone organoids to model Schmid-type metaphyseal chondrodysplasia (MCDS), a rare genetic skeletal disorder which arises from defective type X collagen. He is also studying the transition of cartilage to bone, with a particular focus on understanding the role of RUNX2 and rare cell populations.

Career information