photo of Dr Kat Goodall

Dr Kat Goodall

Dr Kat Goodall

Details

Role Senior Research Officer
Research area Stem Cell Medicine
Dr Katharine Goodall is a Senior Research Officer at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, working with Professor Andrew Elefanty on stem cell therapies for immune deficiencies caused by Rag1 mutations, as a part of the ReNEW program.

Katharine completed her Bachelor of Medical Science at LaTrobe University before undertaking her honours year under the supervision of Professor David Vaux. After working as a research assistant with Professor Philip Nagley at Monash University, Katharine was awarded the LaTrobe University Postgraduate Scholarship along with a Collaborative Research Centre – Biomarkers Translation Scholarship and with these she completed a PhD at LaTrobe University with A/Prof Mark Hulett, studying the role of the enzyme heparanase in inflammation and inflammatory disorders.

In 2015, Katharine was employed as a postdoctoral fellow under Dr Dan Andrews at Monash University in the department of Immunology and Human Pathology. During this time, Katharine researched the role of the non-classical MHC-I in both NK cell and gamma delta T cell development, maturation and function. Katharine expanded her interest in cancer therapy by starting a postdoctoral position at the Australian Centre for Blood Disease, working with A/Prof Ross Dickins and his team. Katharine drove the research into checkpoint blockade inhibitors and immunotherapy in response to tumour burden.

Following on with her research into immunotherapies, Katharine worked as a Senior Scientist at oNKo-innate, a discovery-stage biotechnology company dedicated to immuno-oncology target identification and therapeutic development. Katharine was an in-vivo lead for oNKo and brought her knowledge of Natural Killer cells alongside her immunotherapy knowledge to this role.

Katharine has convened the Monash University Immunology and Pathology Department Seminar Series, has been on the Victorian Infection and Immunity Network (VIIN) committee, was on the board of the Early Mid Career Researcher Committee at Alfred Health where she served as Treasurer, was on the Australian Society for Medical Research (ASMR) committee, and Chaired the Victorian Day Of Immunology (DoI) Vaccination café. As this event grew, Katharine also headed the Immunisation Coalition's Vaccination Cafe for several years, and now volunteers at the yearly event.
Dr Katharine Goodall is a Senior Research Officer at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, working with Professor Andrew Elefanty on stem cell therapies for immune deficiencies caused by Rag1 mutations, as a part of the ReNEW program.

Katharine...
Dr Katharine Goodall is a Senior Research Officer at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, working with Professor Andrew Elefanty on stem cell therapies for immune deficiencies caused by Rag1 mutations, as a part of the ReNEW program.

Katharine completed her Bachelor of Medical Science at LaTrobe University before undertaking her honours year under the supervision of Professor David Vaux. After working as a research assistant with Professor Philip Nagley at Monash University, Katharine was awarded the LaTrobe University Postgraduate Scholarship along with a Collaborative Research Centre – Biomarkers Translation Scholarship and with these she completed a PhD at LaTrobe University with A/Prof Mark Hulett, studying the role of the enzyme heparanase in inflammation and inflammatory disorders.

In 2015, Katharine was employed as a postdoctoral fellow under Dr Dan Andrews at Monash University in the department of Immunology and Human Pathology. During this time, Katharine researched the role of the non-classical MHC-I in both NK cell and gamma delta T cell development, maturation and function. Katharine expanded her interest in cancer therapy by starting a postdoctoral position at the Australian Centre for Blood Disease, working with A/Prof Ross Dickins and his team. Katharine drove the research into checkpoint blockade inhibitors and immunotherapy in response to tumour burden.

Following on with her research into immunotherapies, Katharine worked as a Senior Scientist at oNKo-innate, a discovery-stage biotechnology company dedicated to immuno-oncology target identification and therapeutic development. Katharine was an in-vivo lead for oNKo and brought her knowledge of Natural Killer cells alongside her immunotherapy knowledge to this role.

Katharine has convened the Monash University Immunology and Pathology Department Seminar Series, has been on the Victorian Infection and Immunity Network (VIIN) committee, was on the board of the Early Mid Career Researcher Committee at Alfred Health where she served as Treasurer, was on the Australian Society for Medical Research (ASMR) committee, and Chaired the Victorian Day Of Immunology (DoI) Vaccination café. As this event grew, Katharine also headed the Immunisation Coalition's Vaccination Cafe for several years, and now volunteers at the yearly event.

Top Publications

  • Mayfosh, AJ, Goodall, KJ, Nguyen, T, Baschuk, N, Hulett, MD. Heparanase is a regulator of natural killer cell activation and cytotoxicity. Journal of Leukocyte Biology 111(6) : 1211 -1224 2022
    view publication
  • Goodall, KJ, Nguyen, A, Andrews, DM, Sullivan, LC. Ribosylation of the CD8αβ heterodimer permits binding of the nonclassical major histocompatibility molecule, H2-Q10. Journal of Biological Chemistry 297(4) : 101141 2021
    view publication
  • Goodall, KJ, Nguyen, A, McKenzie, C, Eckle, SBG, Sullivan, LC, Andrews, DM. The murine CD94/NKG2 ligand, Qa-1b, is a high-affinity, functional ligand for the CD8αα homodimer. Journal of Biological Chemistry 295(10) : 3239 -3246 2020
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  • Goodall, KJ, Nguyen, A, Sullivan, LC, Andrews, DM. The expanding role of murine class Ib MHC in the development and activation of Natural Killer cells. Molecular Immunology 115: 31 -38 2019
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  • Goodall, KJ, Nguyen, A, Matsumoto, A, McMullen, JR, Eckle, SB, Bertolino, P, Sullivan, LC, Andrews, DM. Multiple receptors converge on H2‐Q10 to regulate NK and γδT‐cell development. Immunology and Cell Biology 97(3) : 326 -339 2019
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